Thursday, March 11, 2010

From the Mailbag

A few weeks ago, I received an e-mail message from someone who had ordered one of my books, but had not yet read it. From that e-mail, I learned that this person was a student learning English who had a class requirement to read an English novel. After that, I received an e-mail asking several questions, which I happily answered. I also posted the answers. Today, I am posting the latest e-mail:

Dear Timothy,

I enjoyed reading and studying your book. I had learnt a lot of new English words and phrases during my reading. I loved all the characters in the novel they were easy to follow and down to earth. The character I like most is Sara’s father Mark Dawson. The way he treats, teachs and raises his daugther is admirable. He listens to her and always try to do his best. My favourite episode with him is when Mark and his daughther go out to the restaurant after visiting the bookshop and meets the waitress. He teaches Sara some important lessons that may help her in the future. My personal opinion is that every working parent can identify himself with Mark.

Many episodes capture my attention. The one I remember most is went Sara was printing out Ellen’s profile from her father’s computer. It made me say hurry up, hurry up.

The characters’ belief (Sara, Mark and Ellen) gave me comfort throughtout the reading. Their simple but effective prayers made them more practical and sensible.

I loved Searching For Mom. Your writing had been a blessing in improving my English and I had learnt important lessons for life by reading your novel. Thank you for aswering all my questions.

You are a good writer and I can gladly recommed Searching For Mom to anyone who wants to read a good comtemporary fiction novel.

I wish you the best in the future.

L. J.

Needless to say, I love getting letters like this, especially from people who don’t know me from Adam. It’s letters like this that keep us going, even if the money doesn’t. And this is the type of letter you hope for when you put your e-mail address in the book.

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